What does a wireless security expert do?

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1. Introduction Wireless networking has many benefits Productivity improves due to greater access to information. Network setup and restructuring is easier, faster and cheaper. However, wireless technology also creates new threats and changes existing information security security informat

What does a wireless security expert do?

Wireless Internet Security: Weaknesses, Threats, and Countermeasures

wireless security expert

Wireless networks offer many benefits, but they also combine with new security threats and change the organization's overall security information.

  1. Introduction Wireless networking has many benefits Productivity improves due to greater access to information. Network setup and restructuring is easier, faster and cheaper. However, wireless technology also creates new threats and changes existing information security security information. For example, because communication takes place "over the air" with radio frequencies, the risk of eavesdropping is greater than with cable systems. If the message is not encrypted, or encrypted using a weak algorithm, the attacker can read it and thereby reduce confidentiality. Although wireless networks change the risks posed by various security threats, the overall security objectives are the same as those of cable networks: maintaining confidentiality, ensuring integrity and maintaining the availability of information and information systems.

Wireless Internet Security: Weaknesses, Threats, and Countermeasures

 

Wireless networks offer many benefits, but they also combine with new security threats and change the organization's overall security information. Although the use of technology solutions has emerged as a combination of wireless security threats and risks, wireless security is a primary management issue. Threat management accomplished with wireless technology requires a robust assessment and risk assessment at the point of view of the environment and development plans to reduce identified threats.

  1. Introduction Wireless networking has many benefits Productivity improves due to greater access to information. Network setup and restructuring is easier, faster and cheaper. However, wireless technology also creates new threats and changes existing information security security information. For example, because communication takes place "over the air" with radio frequencies, the risk of eavesdropping is greater than with cable systems. If the message is not encrypted, or encrypted using a weak algorithm, the attacker can read it and thereby reduce confidentiality. Although wireless networks change the risks posed by various security threats, the overall security objectives are the same as those of cable networks: maintaining confidentiality, ensuring integrity and maintaining the availability of information and information systems.

to help managers make such decisions by giving them a basic understanding of the nature of the various threats associated with wireless networks and the countermeasures available.

2.1.2 Malicious Association "Malicious Association" occurs when crackers can cause wireless devices to connect to a corporate network via their cracked laptop rather than a corporate access point (AP). These types of laptops are called "software access points" and are made when a hacker runs a software program that compares the wireless network card and the legal access point.

2.1.4 Poor connections Normal communication, such as Bluetooth private network, is not protected from breakdown and must be carried at risk. Even barcode scanners, portable PDAs, and wireless printers and copiers need to be protected. These non-traditional networks can be easily overlooked by IT staff who focus on laptops and hotspots. 2.1.5 Identity theft (MAC spoofing) Identity theft (or MAC spoofing) occurs when a hacker can spy on network traffic and identify the MAC address of a computer with network privileges. Most wireless systems allow some form of MAC filtering to allow only authorized computers with specific MAC IDs to access and use the network. However, there are several programs that have network "discovery" capabilities. Combine these programs with other software that allows a computer to pretend to have whatever MAC address the cracker wants, and the cracker can easily get around that hurdle. 2.1.6 Man-in-the-middle attacks A man-in-the-middle attacker encourages computers to authenticate to a computer configured as a soft AP (access point).

 

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